FAQ


Frequently Asked Questions:

I have a well, what does a well look like? 

Refer to our Well diagram.

I have a well, should I test my water? When and what for? 

The MN Department of Health recommends annual testing for coliform bacteria, bi-annual testing for nitrate, and at least one test for arsenic and lead. For more information, refer to our When to Test page.

How do I collect a water sample for lead testing?  

You can get all that information from our helpful lead test how-to newsletter .

How do I collect a water sample for coliform bacteria testing?

Watch this brief video on how to collect a sample for coliform bacteria testing.

        My well tested positive for Coliform bacteria.  What do I do now?
        Disinfect your well.  Refer to our Disinfecting Your Well page.

How do I collect a water sample for nitrate testing?

Fill a non-sterile bottle with at least 1 cup of water from any cold faucet.  Deliver to lab within 30 hours. Nitrate levels must be less than 10ppm to be within acceptable limits.

What do I do if my water has tested above 10 ppm for nitrates?

You can get a treatment system: ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, or distillation OR determine the source of contamination and potentially eradicate the source.  See our newsletter for more information about nitrate contamination.

How do I collect a water sample for arsenic testing?

Fill a non-sterile bottle with 2 cups of water from any cold water faucet. Deliver to lab within 48 hours. Arsenic levels must be less than 10ppb to be within acceptable limits.

What do I do if my water tested above 10ppb?

You can get a treatment system: ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, or distillation OR determine the source of contamination and potentially eradicate the source.  See our newsletter for more information about nitrate contamination.

What causes the rotten-egg smell in my water?

Hydrogen sulfide gas is the most common cause of the smell.  It is produced by sulfur bacteria that occur naturally in groundwater.  Filters can be used to rid the water of the smell such as: a carbon filter, an oxidizing filter, or an oxidation-filtration system.

Can the rotten-egg smell come from another source?

Yes, in some cases it may be from sewage or other pollution.  Therefore, it is recommended that a coliform bacteria test be conducted to be sure the water is safe to drink.

 

Additional Information: